A History of
Faith-Based
Media

A History of
Faith-Based
Media

1962
BEGINNING WITH
A VISION…
On June 2, 1962, a 26-year-old pastor in Pembroke, Ontario, Rev. David Mainse launched his first television show, Crossroads as a weekly 15-minute Saturday program, following the late-night news. His message was simple, direct and personal:
1962-david-mainse3
David Mainse’s partner in life and ministry, Norma-Jean, also devoted herself to sharing the message of hope and love found in Jesus.
1962-Norma-Jean
1962-Norma-Jean
1975-
1977
REACHING ALL AGES
Crossroads syndicates across Canada and children’s programming begins with Circle Square – airing for 13 years in 50 countries, impacting a whole new generation.
This outreach to children would quickly expand, and Circle Square Ranch would become one of the largest
camp programs in Canada.
1977-
1980
On June 15, 1977, 100 Huntley Street broadcasts from Canada’s first studio exclusively dedicated to Christian TV in downtown Toronto.
100 Huntley Street continues to feature personal guest stories, Gospel music and a live studio audience, but now with 24/7 telephone prayer line support for viewers.
HUMANITARIAN RELIEF
Crossroads Emergency Relief and Development Fund (renamed Crossroads Cares) is born following an earthquake in Italy — aid has been delivered to 40+ countries since.
1981-
1982
GROWING INFLUENCE
Summer of ‘81: “Salute to Canada” takes 100 Huntley Street on the road to 25 cities across Canada, broadcasting live daily. The first of four extended ministry tours allows David Mainse to meet faithful viewers and supporters in person.
Crossroads Conway School of Broadcasting launches, resulting in 1,200 graduates reaching potential radio/TV audience of 3 billion in 88 countries.
broadcasting licensing in Canada
David begins lobbying federal government for religious broadcasting licensing in Canada.
CONNECTING OUR PASTCONNECTING OUR PAST
1984-
1986
How do you visually portray eternity?
INTERNATIONAL IMPACT

100 Huntley Street raises $8 million with viewer-support and matching funds from the Canadian Foodgrains Bank to help famine victims in Ethiopia.

The Canadian Ambassador to Ethiopia credits Crossroads for saving 51,000 lives.

At the World’s Fair, Expo ‘86 in British Columbia, Crossroads created the first Pavilion of Promise, presenting the Gospel to international visitors.
1992-
1998
MEDIA MISSION TAKES OFF

CRTC grants Crossroads Television Systems (CTS) a 24-hour, over-the-air “religiously-balanced” channel. Production shifts into high gear with programs created for the whole family.

CTS (now Yes TV) begins broadcasting in Ontario, Calgary and Edmonton.

MEDIA MISSION TAKES OFF
Norma-Jean Mainse cuts the ribbon at the CTS station launch
MEDIA MISSION TAKES OFF
Crossroads moves to The Crossroads Centre, a brand new, state-of-the-art television production facility in Burlington, ON.
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Crossroads moves to The Crossroads Centre, a brand new, state-of-the-art television production facility in Burlington, ON.
BUILDING OUR FUTUREBUILDING OUR FUTURE
2012-
2018
50 YEARS OF MINISTRY!
100 Huntley Street airs 10,000th show — becoming Canada’s longest-running
TV program with 1 million+
weekly viewers.
David accepts the Lifetime Global Impact Award.
Crossroads launches Castle — a streaming service featuring thousands of faith and family titles.